Little Bitte Featured in Vogue!

Why Providence, Rhode Island, Should Be Your Next Weekend Getaway

For now, I bounce from coast to coast, but I plan to die in Providence. I was student at the Rhode Island School of Design more than a decade ago, and the magic of that jewel-box of a city still pulls on my heartstrings. It’s the Victorian homes, industrial buildings, the charmingly gruff New England personalities, and concentration of Italian American markets that have kept me coming back. The town is divided by the Providence river, separating the posh, College Hill area to its east, and the grittier, fast-developing downtown, Olneyville, Federal Hill, and Atwells to the west. Most tourists will cling to the picturesque, colonial Benefit street, with its gas lamps and pristine mansions, but that’s only a tiny sliver of what the city has to offer. This place has chutzpah. It’s the blue collar dive bar and the Ivy League, it’s Mayflower meets crust punk. What other city’s most beloved mayor was a convicted felon and the face of a popular line of packaged red sauce? R.I.P Buddy Cianci…..

…. For smaller grassroots galleries, World’s Fair Gallery is a tiny storefront next to the Columbus Theater that mounts thoughtful shows with local artists. It’s run by the owners of Little Bitte cocktails, a craft cocktail company that often pops up around town.

Full Article Here

WE’RE SO EXCITED!!!

❤ Little Bitte

 

Happy Saint Patty’s Day!

LittleBitte_St.Pats_Day
Photo by Angel Tucker

Bitte Irish Cream

12 oz Irish whiskey

3 oz crème de cocoa

8 oz organic cream

5 oz espresso (or very strong coffee)

2 oz local honey

1 teaspoon organic vanilla extract

Fresh mint to garnish

Preparation: Gather all of your ingredients. Dissolve honey in espresso, pour into a large clean bottle (liter), add Irish whiskey, cream, crème de cocoa and vanilla in a large sealable clean glass bottle or jar, shake until solution is mixed throughly and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks. 

Serve: On the rocks or shaken over ice and poured onto fresh rocks & garnish with mint sprig.  Yields 10 servings. Cheers!

❤ Little Bitte

Let me tell you about The Birds n’ Bees…

Birds n Bees Cocktail
Photo by Chip Riegel

The Birds ’n’ Bees is my spin on a favorite classic, the Hanky Panky, by one of my favorite bartending heroines: Ada Coleman, who began bartending at the ultra-swanky Savoy Hotel in London in 1903. Ada rose to the position of head bartender at the American Bar in The Savoy in 1925 and she’s still making waves as one of the first women to make a serious impression on modern mixology.

The original recipe for the Hanky Panky is a stirred cocktail made with equal parts gin and sweet vermouth with a splash of Fernet Branca, a bitter aromatic Italian amaro. The Birds ’n’ Bees swaps sweet vermouth for Vermut, an incredible vermouth hailing from the region of Catalonia in Spain, that’s bitter, sweet, nutty and fruity, infused with a proprietary blend of herbs and botanicals. Instead of Fernet, I opt for an alternative cordial, nocino, a sweet, tannic walnut liqueur that flies a little under the radar in the U.S. but popular in Italy, especially during autumn when walnuts are harvested and infused into this heavenly cordial.

Instead of garnishing with the normal orange peel, I garnish with a pinch of bee pollen, a nutrient-rich superfood collected by worker bees, parts nectar and pollen, sweet and reminiscent of wildflowers and fresh citrus zest. When serving nocino, remember to alert any guest with a nut allergy.

Visit Edible Rhody for the recipe 

Workshop 9/28 – Colorful Centerpieces and Fiery Sips!

bitte-weatherlow-sips.jpg

We’re excited to announce our next workshop Colorful Centerpieces and Fiery Sips celebrating Fall Equinox with Weatherlow Florals at Weatherlow Farms on September 28th, 5-7pm

Join us in the barn to build your own bouquet & learn how to make 2 new signatures featuring autumnal ingredients from the harvest. Both the arrangements and drinks will feature edible flowers and herbs, all grown and foraged at the farm, including dahlias and amaranths and ornamental herbs. $75 includes all materials, drinks, and bites.

Register Here

💎@christinechitnis

 Little Bitte 

Little Bitte at PVDFest!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Little Bitte Bar Schedule

Were winding up for a big weekend here in lil’ Rhody and we’re hoping you’ll make it to one of our bars this weekend! Try a festival spritz or a mocktail & say hello! 

June 1st 5-7PM  | THE COMMUNITY TABLE

Join us in Kennedy Plaza on Washington Street for a 300 seat dinner that’s free + open to the public. Well break bread and share stories.

June 3rd | 4-10PM | Little Bitte PVDFest VIP BAR @ Burnside Park 

Featuring our signature festival cocktail, the PVD Spritz, a fresh & fabulous Margarita +  smoky mezcal & bourbon cocktails that will certainly put a pep in your step!

(Complimentary Wine + Whalers Brewing Beer on tap!)

June 4th 1-8PM |The PVDFest Finale

The PVDFest Finale at Armory Park between Cranston Street + Parade Street!!! Come find us in our neck of the woods  for a famous ‘Lime in the Coconut’ or a Signature Paloma with silver tequila + grapefruit!

What to know about #PVDFest

PVDFest showcases performers from around the country and all over the globe, including some of the biggest stars in world music. This year alone features musicians, dancers, and performance artists from Harlem, Miami, Detroit, Oakland, East LA, Montreal, Trinidad, and Honduras. Of course, there is no shortage of talent here in our own backyard, and many local performers will be sharing the stage with the national and international talent. Catch some of the highlights on the PVDFest Blog

❤ Little Bitte

This Aperol Cocktail is Perfect for Spring!

2-blood-orange..jpg

The Aperature – a cocktail made from Aperol, gin, and blood oranges – helps usher in spring while saying goodbye to citrus season.

In my early twenties, I lived in Florence for a year on a street called Via degli Artisti with a wonderful painter named Fiorella, a sandy blonde with a scratchy voice and a deep affection for card games, rum, and cigars. We were a 10-minute ride on our rusty bicycles from the heart of city, and a brisk five-minute walk from the main market near Santa Maria Novella. The first warm sunny days of spring always remind me of Fiorella and how she would wake up each morning, fling open the kitchen doors, and step onto our tiny terrazza to water the scented geraniums on the railing. She’d come back into the kitchen and fresh squeeze two glasses of blood orange juice by hand, one for each of us.

The fruits Fiorella juiced were called Moro oranges. Grown in Sicily, they tasted more like fresh raspberries than any kind of orange I had ever tasted, with flesh ranging from deep orange to dark burgundy. I lived for these oranges and those mornings when Fiorella made me sit down with her for breakfast.

As I wait here at home for the flora of the season to pop, I scan my imagination for ways to conjure spring. I keep a keen eye on the oily green rhubarb leaves peeking out of the soil in my raised bed. I visit the micro clusters of lemon balm daily – but it’s still too soon to pick it. And the asparagus nowhere in sight. And so I find solace in fresh oranges at this time of year – so sweet and so abundant – though I know that the harvest must be on its last legs. Clementines and minneolas will slowly but surely trickle out of season, soon to be replaced with the awe of artichokes, fiddleheads, and fresh nettles.


One of my favorite epiphanies from my time in Florence came in the form of a cocktail. I call it the Aperture, as it’s proverbial widening of the lens, if you will. It’s a marriage of two of my favorite classic drinks, the Aperol spritz (a quaffable mix of the bitter aperitif, prosecco, and soda water) and the Negroni (equal parts gin, Campari, and sweet vermouth). Every café in Florence serves their own version of a Negroni during aperitivo (cocktail hour), complemented by a bowl of olives or nuts, or sometimes a bigger spread of cured meats, cheese, and crostini topped with anything from fresh seafood to tiny slices of hotdog. (During aperitivo, anything is possible.)3-blood-orange..jpg

The Aperture’s soft, fruity notes come from the blood orange juice, which adds a lush texture and depth to the spritz, mellowing any sharp edges from the gin and fortifying the citrusy notes of the Aperol….

7-birds-eye-bloose-orange..jpg

The Aperture Recipe

❤ Little Bitte

For Fiorella, my Italian queen.

A Taste of Tiki : Modern Tropical

modern-tropical-tiki copy.jpg

The tiki genre is one of the most alluring and misunderstood movements in American cocktail history. Known for its romanticized mash-up of Pacific island cultures, tiki was invented in 1930s Hollywood by a world-traveling rumrunner named Don the Beachcomber, born Ernest Raymond Beaumont Gantt. Tiki cocktails were a liquid vacation and an escape from the darkness of the Depression era. Eighty years later, tropical cocktails continue to deliver the miraculous ability to evoke paradise, no matter the climate.

Visit Edible Rhody for the full story & “The Wolf of Mainstreet” cocktail recipe  by our pal Jason Kindness.

Photograph by the great Chip Riegel.